8. Observation of dark matter

Causing people to death the moment the Phantasmagoria.

This is obviousby the samples he had been accidentally killed by EEG brainwave.

A occurs starts choking and brain into charge of oxygen molecules in the memory cells of the brain.

Shown in the No.12-14

 The implication is that of EEG recording after cardiac arrest to brain disorder is occurring. Phantasmagoria experience is experiencing at this time. After the suffocation occur immediately. For the person in question feel long time. Loss of consciousness is choking 1 minute to1 minute 30 seconds later. Cause tonic convulsions and lost consciousness, leading to death.

Become a key to solve the dark matter of this brain disorder.

As an experiment, the brain and ECG electrodes attached to the free diver, they dived to the bottom of the water.

Possible energy occurs during that time.

If you make the analysis of the energy generated the same mechanism as the observation method of "Kamiokande" by placing the sensor 1m pitches on the circumference of the depth of 120m on the Lake of fresh water observation of dark matteris what is known to predict.


No.12                                       No.13                                  No.14

   

As the authoritie step by step Medical Academy issued EEG interpretation cases chapter No. 2Edition 1995   Author Admin Professor Teruo Ohkuma writing help Professor Hiroo Matsuoka, Professor Takashi Ueno  pp176-178




黄色のファイル 2014/a yellow file, reson for Schizophrenia








































































                                                                       


                                                                     



                                                                 
                                                                   


                                                                           


                                 
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